More Olympic Cocktails

Flickr: TylerIngram

I don’t know about you, but here at the League we’ve been watching a lot of the Winter Olympic games.  Seeing all that snow and ice has inspired me to try some new drinks with the Olympic theme in mind. Here are a couple of the good ones:

Alpine Glow

  • 1 part Cointreau
  • 2 parts Lemon Juice
  • 4 parts Cognac  (I used Rémy Martin VSOP)
  • 4 parts Gold Label Rum (I used Appleton Estate V/X)
  • 1 or two dashes of grenadine to each drink (use a real pomegranate grenadine, not Rose’s)

This is from David A. Embury’s The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948), hence the proportions instead of exact measurements. If you let 1 part equal an ounce, this will make 4 cocktails. Do some simple math and you can adjust it to your needs (frankly, this is about the only math I care to do these days).  I mixed this for the first time last night for my ol’ man and myself while watching some rad womens’ downhill action. It was a cocktail up to the event and one I will definitely add to my quiver. Try it, you’ll like it.

Also from Mr. Embury’s fine tome:

Olympic

  • 1 part Cherry Heering liqueur
  • 2 parts Lime Juice
  • 8 parts White Label Cuban Rum

As Mr. Embury points out, this is a basic Daiquiri with Cherry Heering substituted for the simple syrup. Obviously, the Cuban rum was unavailable, so I took some liberties and substituted 10 Cane Rum. This makes a tart, dry drink.

Published in: on February 21, 2010 at 10:52 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Sweet and Lovely

Photo by Esther Kirby, Flickr

A little rough around the edges, but sweet and lovely all the same. Here is a cocktail from David A. Embury’s The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948):

Sweet and Lovely

  • 1 part Maraschino & Grenadine (half and half)
  • 2 parts Lime Juice
  • 3 parts Gin
  • 5 parts Applejack

Shake with cracked ice.

Make sure you use Maraschino liqueur, not the juice from your maraschino cherry jar.  I substituted raspberry syrup for the grenadine which I liked, but either way would work. Just make sure to use real pomegranate grenadine and all will be good.

Published in: on January 24, 2010 at 11:18 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Singapore Sling

Singapore Sling at Raffles Hotel, Flickr: Nettsu

Ah… nothing like the Friday night at the start of a long weekend.  A twinkle in your eye, a spring in your step. Time to relax, unwind. What to make to kick off the weekend?  Why not make a cocktail that calls to mind exotic locales, extended vacations, and balmy breezes?  A Singapore Sling, I thought. That might fit the bill.  Having never had one before, I turned to my trusty books (I am a librarian after all).  I consulted Charles H. Baker, Jr., David A. Embury, Ted Haigh, and Dale DeGroff.  In 1948, Embury wrote, “Of all the recipes published for this drink, I have never seen any two that were alike.”  Right he was, because the 4 recipes these gentlemen put forth were all different (apparently, the original 1915 recipe is locked in a safe in its birthplace, so I assume there was a lot of guessing going on). I ultimately decided to go with Ted Haigh aka Dr. Cocktail’s recipe for the Singapore Sling, although Mr. Baker claimed to have the bona fide recipe from the venerable Raffles Hotel.  Now, while I love Mr. Baker (LOVE him) sometimes I worry about his recipes.  He cracks me up, I mean, the man is laugh out loud funny, but I trust Dr. Cocktail to make a good drink, so I went with his Singapore Sling.  Regardless of the recipe used, I believed (after tasting the drink) what Mr. Baker wrote of this cocktail:

The Singapore Gin Sling is a delicious, slow-acting, insidious thing.

Or as my husband put it, “Wow. I could drink these all night. Wow.”

My Singapore Sling

The Singapore Sling

  • 2 oz gin
  • 3/4 oz Cherry Heering (or other cherry-flavored brandy)
  • 2 tsp Benedictine
  • 2 tsp Cointreau
  • 2 oz pineapple juice
  • 3/4 oz fresh lime juice
  • 2 dashes real pomegranate grenadine
  • 1 dash Angostura bitters
  • Soda water

Combine all except soda in an iced shaker.  Shake and strain into a collins or highball glass with a few lumps of ice. Top with soda water. Garnish with a cherry, a pineapple slice, and an orange wheel.

Recipe from Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails by Ted Haigh aka Dr. Cocktail.

Published in: on January 15, 2010 at 9:02 pm  Leave a Comment  
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The Benz

Zirbenz, Stone Pine Liqueur of the Alps

Today I denuded the Christmas tree, a pretty little thing that cheered our hearts and scented our home for the holiday season.  I thought it fitting that I used the last drop of Zirbenz, Stone Pine Liqueur of the Alps, as I completed this bittersweet task.  In a roundabout way, Zirbenz is responsible for The Antifogmatic League.  I was one of the lucky few to get a golden ticket to the first sneak peek opening of Smuggler’s Cove on Dec. 4, 2009.  One of the drinks I sampled that night was the Calibogus, a “blend of Zirbenz Stone Pine liqueur, spruce tincture, molasses, seltzer and Smuggler’s Cove Private Reserve rum with a dash of lime”.  I was curious about the name, Calibogus, and while I was googling it, I stumbled upon the term antifogmatic, which of course, I fell in love with.  Anyway, I was intrigued enough with the Calibogus that when I chanced upon a bottle of Zirbenz at Blackwell’s I snatched it up.  I’ve been experimenting with it for the last few weeks and liking most of the results.  My favorite of the Zirbenz cocktails was created by accident this past week during our Tahoe vacation.  I was in the middle of mixing up some Montreal Gin Sours from Embury’s The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks when I ran out of gin.  I substituted Zirbenz for half the gin and the result was enthusiastically received by all.  And so, dear reader, I give you the Zirbenz Gin Sour, otherwise known as …

The Benz

The Benz

  • 1 part Simple Syrup
  • 2 parts Lemon Juice
  • 4 parts Gin
  • 4 parts Zirbenz
  • 1 Egg White to each 2 drinks

Embury uses proportions rather than measurements, so you can adjust accordingly.  If you let 1 part equal an ounce and use 2 egg whites this will make 4 cocktails.  Add the egg white, simple syrup, and lemon juice first and shake with ice to get the egg frothing.  Then add the gin and shake again. Finally add the Zirbenz and shake one last time. Strain into chilled glasses.

Don’t let the “pretty in pink” color fool you.  This is a nice, fairly dry cocktail.  Yes, my pictures stink, but if you click on this pic you can see the color better.

The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks

The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks

This was one of my Christmas presents this year, and I’m enjoying it thoroughly. In fact, I’m going to go back to the couch and read some more!  I’ll report back later.

Published in: on January 1, 2010 at 10:04 pm  Leave a Comment  
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